Storm Gladys forecast to hit TODAY bringing snow, lightning & Met Office yellow warning

A NEW storm is set to hit the UK TODAY, just days after the unruly weather from Storm Eunice.

The next storm is set to be called Gladys, as it is next on the Met Office’s list of names. However it has not yet been confirmed and named by forecasters, but the Met Office has issued a yellow weather warning as 60mph gale force winds.

Today, a new yellow weather warning for wind has been issued for parts of the North East, Cumbria and North Yorkshire from 6am to 3pm.
A yellow warning for wind and snow has also been issued for parts of Scotland and Northern Ireland with heavy snow showers forecast as well as ‘very gusty winds’.

Parts of the UK including London and Bristol could also see up to 2cm of snowfall per hour on Thursday, according to the latest weather graphs by WXcharts.

Snow will reach the north of England from 6pm on Wednesday continuing down to the Midlands overnight, according to the latest predictions.

Bristol could see snowy weather between 9am and midday on Thursday when there is a chance snow will scatter parts of southern England.

Read our weather live blog for the latest on Storm Eunice…

  • Snow warning in place until tomorrow

    The Met Office has warned that even low levels in some areas can expect up to 10cm of the white stuff while wild weather continues to hammer the UK.

    Met Office meteorologist Mark Wilson said a snow warning is in place for parts of Scotland and Northern Ireland from 1pm today until 3pm tomorrow.

    Up to 10cm of snow is expected at low levels, rising to 30cm on higher ground in Scotland where blizzards are on the cards.

  • Flood warnings in place (Continued…)

    A further six alerts and one warning cover Wales, while in Scotland there are five in force.

    The rare “severe” warnings pushed police to declare “major incidents” in Worcestershire and Shropshire yesterday, with some told only to remain at home if they have enough food, water and medical supplies to last at least a week.

    Around 400 properties have already flooded as a result of the heavy rain, but the Environment Agency says many more are expected to give in later today.

    EA flood duty manager Katharine Smith advised people to stay away from swollen rivers and to take “extreme care” when out.

  • Brits told to flee homes following ‘danger to life’ flood warnings

    Two severe warnings are in force today along the River Severn where rising water levels pose a “significant danger to life” and residents are being urged to flee their homes.

    Hundreds have already been evacuated, and the Met Office “strongly recommends” others move out from behind the defences due to the risk of their houses becoming engulfed.

    Anyone living nearby in Ironbridge, Shropshire, and Bewdley, Worcestershire, has also been told to move possessions and valuables off the ground or to safety, and to turn off gas, electricity and water.

    There are two severe flood warnings, 62 warnings and 66 alerts in place in England as the wild weather sweeps in.

    Bewdley, Worcestershire, where floodwater has breached the town’s defenceCredit: PA
    The River Severn has breached the flood defencesCredit: PA
    The River Severn has breached the flood defencesCredit: PA
  • Storm Gladys could arrive TODAY

    The Met Office has issued multiple yellow weather warnings for parts of northern England, Scotland and Northern Ireland today and tomorrow.

    People in parts of the south of England and Wales were also told not to leave their homes as rare red warnings for wind were issued.

    Today, a new yellow weather warning for wind has been issued for parts of the North East, Cumbria and North Yorkshire from 6am to 3pm.

    Yellow weather warnings have been issued for today (Met Office)
    Yellow weather warnings have been issued for today (Met Office)
  • Destruction of much of the UK following Storm Eunice

    The treacherous conditions led to travel chaos, flight cancellations, power cuts and police forces being inundated with calls on Friday and over the weekend.

    Train networks were plagued by flying debris – and there was extensive damage to buildings and homes, with the roof of the O2 ripped off.

    A massive clean-up begun yesterday after Storm Eunice brought widespread damage, disruption and record-breaking 122mph gusts of wind to the UK.

    Thousands of families across the UK have remained without power, days after Storm Eunice’s gale-force winds toppled power lines and cut off their supply.

  • Protect your garden with these 5 expert tips

    Severe weather like this can be especially damaging to our gardens, and experts are advising people to take precaution.

    With this in mind, Nick Drewe, homes and interior expert at WeThrift, has issued five top tips on how to stormproof your garden.

    1. Protect your electrics If you have outdoor lighting, heaters or even a powered jacuzzi, it’s most likely that you spent a substantial amount of money on your outdoor electrical equipment.
    2. Move your wheelie bins and any loose items When it comes to vulnerable items in your garden during the event of a storm, your wheelie bin is definitely one to protect and store away. When blown away, they could damage windows or cars nearby. The same applies for any loose items in your garden, from deckchairs to kids toys.
    3. Park your car in a garage – or protect it Speaking of cars, make sure your vehicle is parked away in a garage. If you don’t have a garage, a trick is to cover your vehicle with padding and then a plastic sheet or waterproof tarp. As well as this, make sure your vehicle is not parked by or under a tree.
    4. Protect your plants If you have any outdoor potted plants lying around, make sure that these are stored away before the weather gets severe.
    5. Use a wind break Even though your fencing will protect your garden, it’s always worth going the extra mile to guard this area by using a wind break. It’s especially important to use wind breaks if your fencing is weak. Wind breaks can be strategically placed in specific ‘weak spots’ of your garden, such as your vegetable patch or pond.
  • Easy ways to protect your car during severe weather

    With Storm Franklin now hitting the UK, car maintenance expert Ollie Green of Collect Service Go has shared his top 8 tips for protecting your car in severe weather:

    1. Park your car in a garage – This will ultimately keep them protected from debris from strong winds, hail, and water damage. Make sure to check for any gaps where water could leak in and flood your space. 
      If you do not have a garage, move your car to higher ground to avoid flood damage, or if possible, park it against the side of your house to provide some deflection of wind.
    2. Place and weigh down a heavy blanket over your car. This is a quick and simple solution to help protect your car from an array of things a storm could throw at it – particularly hailstones and tree branches.
    3. If you have more time, buy and cover your car with a tight-fitting car cover for additional protection. This will help protect your car from flying debris damage.
    4. Avoid parking under trees and power lines, or in low-lying areas. This will protect your vehicle from debris damage on both a small and large scale as well as flash flood damage.
    5. Inspect the area around your home – lookout for potential hazards such as loose roof tiles and TV antennae that could fall off and damage your car as a result of high winds. 
    6. Fill up on petrol – Do this to avoid long lines at petrol stations and possible petrol/diesel shortages. 
    7. Keep emergency supplies in your car. Recommended equipment includes such as jump leads, tire repair kit, spare tire, flashlights, shovel, and traction mats. Each one could prove helpful if you are stuck out in severe weather.
    8. Avoid driving on coastal or low-lying roads as flooding can occur with no warning. Driving on flooded roads can damage your engine.
  • Protect your garden with these 5 expert tips

    Severe weather like this can be especially damaging to our gardens, and experts are advising people to take precaution.

    With this in mind, Nick Drewe, homes and interior expert at WeThrift, has issued five top tips on how to stormproof your garden.

    1. Protect your electrics If you have outdoor lighting, heaters or even a powered jacuzzi, it’s most likely that you spent a substantial amount of money on your outdoor electrical equipment.
    2. Move your wheelie bins and any loose items When it comes to vulnerable items in your garden during the event of a storm, your wheelie bin is definitely one to protect and store away. When blown away, they could damage windows or cars nearby. The same applies for any loose items in your garden, from deckchairs to kids toys.
    3. Park your car in a garage – or protect it Speaking of cars, make sure your vehicle is parked away in a garage. If you don’t have a garage, a trick is to cover your vehicle with padding and then a plastic sheet or waterproof tarp. As well as this, make sure your vehicle is not parked by or under a tree.
    4. Protect your plants If you have any outdoor potted plants lying around, make sure that these are stored away before the weather gets severe.
    5. Use a wind break Even though your fencing will protect your garden, it’s always worth going the extra mile to guard this area by using a wind break. It’s especially important to use wind breaks if your fencing is weak. Wind breaks can be strategically placed in specific ‘weak spots’ of your garden, such as your vegetable patch or pond.
  • Up to 14 inches SNOW to follow

    UP to 14 inches of snow is set to fall in the wake of Storm Franklin’s 87mph gales.

    As Brits brace for floods and travel disruptions, further “unsettled” weather is expected in the coming days.

    Now meteorologist Mark Wilson told The Sun Online the worst of Storm Franklin has passed but Brits can expect the temperatures to drop as the week goes on.

    Mark said higher ground in Scotland could see “significant” snow accumulation but said levels should be on track for what’s common this time of year.

    WX Charts predicts up to 34cm (14 inches) of snow later in the week in the north.

    Storm Gladys forecast to hit TODAY bringing snow, lightning & Met Office yellow warning
  • Make sure your doors and windows are properly sealed

    Making sure your windows and doors are sealed can make sure that moisture does not seep through any cracks.

    Ross Counsell, a chartered surveyor and director of regulated property buyers Good Move says explains: “This prevents any damage to the interior of your home, and also minimises any mould or mildew damage.

    “Windows should be at least double-glazed to give a further barrier of protection, and make sure to use rubber weather-stripping to fill spaces between the sides and bottom of your door and the door frame.”

  • Clean out the gutters to help drainage

    It’s not a particularly nice job, but checking your guttering is clear before a storm hits can really help prevent potentially extensive damage to walls.

    It can also make them heavy, making them more prone to dislodging from the wall.

    Jenny Turner, a manager at Insulation Express says: “If it is safe to do so, it is advisable to check gutters and pipes outside of the home to ensure that they are clear.

    “A build-up of dead leaves, moss and other debris can cause the gutters to overflow during heavy rain fall, which can affect the walls of the property and damage external plasterwork.”

  • The O2 ‘could be closed for MONTHS’

    THE O2 could be closed for months as gigs at the venue are postponed after Storm Eunice ripped its domed roof to shreds.

    The tempest has wrought devastation around the country today with record 122mph winds.

    Around 1,000 people were evacuated from the arena in London as firefighters rushed to reports the roof had partially collapsed.

    Employees now say the venue, which houses dozens of bars and restaurants, a shopping centre and a massive live music venue, could be closed for months while repairs are made.

    One told the Mirror the roof over the shops “was whipped off” with a “huge whooshing sound”.

    Another said they understood at least part of the building will be shut for weeks to come.

  • ‘Severe gales through to March’

    A Met Office forecaster said told Brits across the country should prepare for the gloomy weather.

    He said: “Monday has early snow crossing northern areas and gales.

    “Tuesday to Thursday will be often windy, with a mix of rain, sleet and snow showers on Thursday.

    “Gales or severe gales will be possible almost anywhere through the period to March 5, and especially in the North.

    “The first half of March is likely to be a continuation of changeable conditions, with winds remaining strong across the North and southern areas less windy.”

  • Temperatures expected to drop

    A Met Office spokesman has said that over the next few days: “Temperatures across Scotland and Northern Ireland are expected to drop sharply following a squally band of rain on Wednesday, with frequent heavy and blustery snow showers arriving from the Atlantic.

    “The showers will be accompanied by strong, blustery winds, with gusts of 50-60 mph possible, and a small chance of 70 mph on coasts.

    “Blizzard conditions are likely over higher ground.

    “Snow showers are increasingly likely to turn back to rain and sleet at low levels later Thursday morning and early afternoon, although remaining as snow above 200-300m.”

  • UK weather outlook for Thursday and Friday

    Early rain across England and Wales will clear south-eastwards during the morning on Thursday to reveal sunny spells and a chance of showers, some wintry.

    Any early showers on Friday will soon clear.

    It will then be fine as it will be dry and bright with long spells of winter sunshine expected.

  • Today’s forecast

    Any early mist will clear.

    It will then be largely dry and bright with spells of sunshine however variable amounts of cloud cover will build.

    Outbreaks of rain will sink south-eastwards across Scotland and Northern Ireland and may be locally heavy.

    Light rain and showers across parts of Wales.

  • Will there be flooding?

    The Environment Agency has urged communities in parts of the West Midlands and the north of England to be prepared for significant flooding until Wednesday.

    It issued severe flood warnings, meaning a “danger to life” for Ironbridge and Bewdley where the temporary flood defences face being overtopped.

    Telford & Wrekin councillor Shaun Davies, who was on the scene in Ironbridge on Tuesday morning said: “Some properties have no protection from flood defences and are still under water, and we have evacuated properties behind defences that could be breached while supporting those who have decided to stay put.

    “We are doing all we can to support residents and are preparing for the worst but hoping for the best.”

    The River Severn bursts it's banks in Ironbridge yesterday afternoon Credit: Solent
    The River Severn bursts it’s banks in Ironbridge yesterday afternoon Credit: Solent
    The flooded Kings Arms pub in YorkCredit: LNP
    The flooded Kings Arms pub in YorkCredit: LNP
    The Old Boathouse is heavily flooded as the River Severn bursts its banks in Ironbridge, ShropsCredit: Craig Thomas/News Images
    The Old Boathouse is heavily flooded as the River Severn bursts its banks in Ironbridge, ShropsCredit: Craig Thomas/News Images
  • Weather expected to settle by Friday

    The weather is expected to settle around Friday when the winds will ease. 

    Met Office meteorologist Mark Wilson said it will “turn a lot drier and brighter” but it might only be a short-lived, calmer spell for some parts.

    Wilson said: “I think at the moment, we’re past the worst, there will be more rain around but not in a similar note to what we’ve seen in recent days.

    “We will be keeping a close eye on it because some areas are quite sensitive to rain after recent flooding.” 

  • So windy, your umbrella might not even help

    Met Office meteorologist Mark Wilson told The Sun Online a snow warning is in place for parts of Scotland and Northern Ireland from 1pm on Wednesday until 3pm on Thursday.

    He said there is a small chance of 70mph winds on the coasts of western Scotland and Northern Ireland but it’s more likely the winds will reach gusts between 50 – 60mph. 

    Low levels up to 10cm of snow can be expected and 30cm on the higher ground of Scotland which are likely to see blizzards.

    It will be blustery across England with winds reaching 30 – 40mph, but the Met Office isn’t forecasting snow to fall outside far northwest of the UK. 

  • Showers with possible lightning

    According to The Daily Mirror, a Met Office spokesman has said that this week: “Temperatures across Scotland and Northern Ireland are expected to drop sharply following a squally band of rain on Wednesday, with frequent heavy and blustery snow showers arriving from the Atlantic.

    “The showers will be accompanied by strong, blustery winds, with gusts of 50-60 mph possible, and a small chance of 70 mph on coasts.

    “Blizzard conditions are likely over higher ground.

    “There is a very small chance that some of the showers could be accompanied by frequent lightning, which may could impact power supplies.

    “Snow showers are increasingly likely to turn back to rain and sleet at low levels later Thursday morning and early afternoon, although remaining as snow above 200-300m.”

  • When will ‘Storm Gladys’ hit the UK?

    The next storm will be called Gladys, as it is next on the Met Office’s list of names, however fully fledged storm has not yet been confirmed and named by forecasters.

    The Met Office has issued a yellow weather warning as 60mph gale force winds, with snow due for many parts of the country.

    The weather system will hit the north west of England from 6am until 3pm on Wednesday, and large parts of Scotland will also see with snow and wind between 1pm to 3pm.

    Another warning is in place for Thursday between 1pm and 3pm, for heavy snow showers, very gusty winds and a small chance of lightning.

  • Who will see snow this week?

    The south of England is yet to be blanketed in snow despite the ever-fluctuating weather patterns.

    Netweather is also predicting that Bristol has a possibility of snow arriving on Thursday, February 24. There is an estimated 24 per cent likelihood as temperatures are expected to feel like -1C.

    In Scotland and Northern Ireland, the Met Office predicts temperatures will drop sharply following a band of rain on Wednesday “with frequent heavy and blustery snow showers arriving from the Atlantic.”

    Forecasters predict 2-5cm of snow in areas away from immediate west-facing coasts, with 7-10cm of snow likely to build up even at low levels.

  • Weather from across the Atlantic

    Meteorologists have said the adverse weather is due to a strong jet stream driving weather systems across the Atlantic.

    Met Office chief meteorologist, Andy Page, said: “As Storm Franklin clears the UK and pushes into the near continent this afternoon the windy conditions will gradually ease and showers become fewer, leaving some dry, sunny weather for many.

    “However, a band of rain and strong winds will reach the northwest overnight and this weather front moves south and east through Tuesday, petering out as it does so.

    “Thursday is potentially the coldest day of the week with a frost to start for some. Gusty winds and heavy rain continue to move south and east across the country, clearing the Southeast of England by lunchtime.

    “Wintry showers are expected mainly over the hills in the north again, but there could be some snow to low levels at times.”

  • Snowfall this week

    Parts of the UK including London and Bristol could see up to 2cm of snowfall per hour on Thursday, according to the latest weather graphs by WXcharts.

    Snow will reach the north of England from 6pm on Wednesday continuing down to the Midlands overnight, according to the latest predictions.

    Bristol could see snowy weather between 9am and midday on Thursday when there is a chance snow will scatter parts of southern England.

  • A new storm?

    A NEW storm is set to hit the UK this week, just days after the unruly weather from Storm Eunice.

    The next storm is set to be called Gladys, as it is next on the Met Office’s list of names. However it has not yet been confirmed and named by forecasters, but the Met Office has issued a yellow weather warning as 60mph gale force winds.

    Storm Gladys could bring more torrential downpour and heavy winds across the country from Thursday, wreaking further havoc.

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