Death Valley Roads Remain Closed and Damage Has Been Assessed – Los Angeles

Although roads remain closed, people who were stuck at Death Valley National Park due to flash flooding have been able drive out safely.

Death Valley National Park was hit hard by heavy rains that caused flash flooding and forced officials to close roads. Nearly 1,000 people were left without power and many vehicles were trapped on Friday.

According to park officials, the park roads will remain closed on Saturday.

According to park officials, after crews worked diligently to clean up storm damage, visitors were finally able to safely drive out of the area with law enforcement escorts.

This photo is provided by the National Park Service. Highway 190 was closed in Death Valley National Park, Calif. on Friday, August 5, 2022. Flash flooding caused heavy rainfall to close several roads in Death Valley National Park, near the California-Nevada border. According to the National Weather Service all park roads were closed on Friday due to flash flooding that occurred after only 1 to 2 inches of rain fell in a very short period of time. (National Park Service via AP).

“I want to thank park staff, the California Department of Transportation, and other partners who are working hard to reopen major roads for travel and manage this incident,”Mike Reynolds, park superintendent, released a statement.

Officials from California Highway Patrol and the Navy have conducted aerial searches to make sure there are no abandoned vehicles or visitors.

At the moment, there have been no injuries.

Most areas that experienced severe flooding have seen the water recede leaving behind large amounts of mud.

Death Valley Roads Remain Closed and Damage Has Been Assessed – Los Angeles

This photo, provided by The National Park Service, shows cars stuck in mud from flash flooding at The Inn Death Valley in Death Valley National Park (Calif.), Friday, August 5, 2022. Flash flooding caused heavy rainfall to close several roads in Death Valley National Park, near the California-Nevada border. According to the National Weather Service all park roads were closed on Friday due to flash flooding that occurred after only 1 to 2 inches of rain fell in a very short period of time. (National Park Service via AP).

These are the updates that officials made after assessing the park:

  • The NPS Emergency Operations Center was damaged by water.
  • The park staff’s residences are at risk from water damage
  • Multiple locations were damaged in Cow Creek by the blowout of residential water lines.
  • Crews from the California Department of Transportation are hard at work clearing highway 190. There is a possibility of a partial opening on Tuesday.

Officials were not able to evaluate the park’s entire extent, which covers 3.4 million acres and has over 1,000 miles of roads. The above list is not exhaustive.

“With the severity and wide-spread nature of this rainfall it will take time to rebuild and reopen everything, and we appreciate your support and patience as we continue this work,” Reynolds said.

Crews will continue to clean the roads and ensure safety for everyone in the park.

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